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2 imported COVID-19 cases detected

The Centre for Health Protection today said it is investigating two additional COVID-19 cases involving men who arrived from Tanzania and the US.   Meanwhile, the centre was notified yesterday of a confirmed case in the UK concerning a 46-year-old man who left Hong Kong for London on Cathay Pacific flight CX251 on July 15. His specimen collected on July 17 tested positive for COVID-19. He was asymptomatic. The centre is following up on the case with the British health authority and epidemiological investigations are underway.   As a prudent measure, Rosedale Hotel Hong Kong, Causeway Bay where the patient had stayed during the incubation period was put under a compulsory testing notice last night, requiring people who had been at the venue for more than two hours from July 4 to 28 to get tested on or before July 31.   A total of 25 cases were reported in Hong Kong in the past 14 days and all of them were imported.   For information and health advice on COVID-19, visit the Gover

Rapid test to combat drug driving

Police will adopt the Rapid Oral Fluid Test from February 19 as a preliminary on-site drug test for drivers involved in traffic accidents and offences or suspected of drug driving.   Authorised police officers will use the instrument to detect whether a driver’s oral fluid contains specified drugs, including heroin, ketamine, MDMA, cannabis, cocaine and methamphetamine.    Drivers who fail the test will be required to provide blood or urine samples for further tests.   Police Traffic Branch Headquarters Acting Senior Superintendent Ng Hoi-wai told the media this afternoon that the instrument is highly accurate and more efficient compared with traditional testing methods.   Mr Ng said: “My personal estimation for the Drug Influence Recognition Observation by the roadside in a traditional method will take our police officers about half an hour, but the current device will take a maximum of eight to 10 minutes.   “I think the number one improvement is the timing, another one is the objectivity.”   Refusing a Rapid Oral Fluid Test or driving under the influence of drugs is a criminal offence. Drivers will be liable to a maximum fine of $25,000, three years’ jail and disqualification from driving.
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