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Curriculum change supported

Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung today welcomed the Baptist University’s move to incorporate national security education in their curriculum, saying it is educators’ duty to promote national security education.   Making the remarks today, Mr Yeung said: “I think this is in accordance to the National Security Law because Article 10 requires all the schools including universities to promote national security education in their schools.”   He added that he believes the higher education institutions are adopting their own approaches in this cause.   “Our requirement is for all these educational institutions to follow the Hong Kong National Security Law, the requirements under the Article 10.”   When asked about a teacher’s comment concerning an athlete’s attire during an Olympic competition, Mr Yeung stressed that the whole community should support the Hong Kong team in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.   “So far I think the relevant persons have already made a clarification about

8 COVID-19 cases reported

 (To watch the full press briefing with sign language interpretation, click here.)   The Centre for Health Protection today said it is investigating eight additional COVID-19 cases, half of which are locally transmitted.   Among the local cases, two have unknown sources of infection.   The centre's Principal Medical & Health Officer Dr Albert Au told a press briefing that one of the unlinked cases involves a 34-year-old man who works in a computer company at Lincoln House in Taikoo Place.   Dr Au noted that the patient had visited K11 MUSEA in Tsim Sha Tsui on February 24 briefly.   “Today we have a confirmed case, number 11071, who had visited K11 MUSEA but just for a very brief time period. He had onset of illness on March 1. He told us that he went to a toilet on G/F of K11 MUSEA for about five to 10 minutes on February 24.   “During that visit he had worn a surgical mask and just went to the toilet without going to other places, and he had no contact with other visitors or people there. However, inside the washroom he took off his mask and also washed his face for a very brief moment.”   He said another patient who had tested preliminary positive for the virus, had visited K11 MUSEA two days later.   “The patient also had onset of illness on March 1. The patient went to K11 MUSEA art house on 4/F to watch a movie on February 26. The patient also wore a mask when visiting K11 MUSEA.   “Our preliminary investigation shows that both cases are of unknown source of infection at this moment.”   Dr Au said judging from the visiting time and symptom onset dates, the centre cannot rule out the possibility that the two patients might have acquired the infection in K11 MUSEA.   “Our investigation is still ongoing. Judging from the history and their visits, the possibility of getting the infection in K11 MUSEA exists, but the chance is not that high because from the confirmed cases recorded so far, there are no patients who had appeared in K11 MUSEA during the period.   “However, we will do further investigations, including liaising with the University of Hong Kong to do genetic sequencing for these two cases to see whether the genetic sequence is the same or different from other cases in the Mr Ming’s Chinese Dining cluster and also in Cartier.”   For information and health advice on COVID-19, visit the Government's dedicated webpage.
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